Finding Ernest Part 3 – Titters

In the Fall of 1929, Ernest Milton was the toast of Broadway, appearing in a successful thriller and receiving thunderous acclaim from critics and audiences. His wife, novelist Naomi Royde-Smith, even managed to create a book out of their New York journey. And yet, by 1933, according to Royde-Smith's biographer Jill Benton, "his career was…

Advertisements

Finding Ernest Part 2 – Broadway Bound

After attending the best schools available in San Francisco, young Ernest Milton disappears for a few years for "private instruction" and materializes, at the age of 22, on the east coast ready not only for a professional acting career but a casting type. Except for a single notable departure (as the whip-cracking camel driver in…

Henry’s Shy Side

After more than a year, I finally reach the final play in the Shakespeare canon - Henry VIII, co-written with John Fletcher. Mysteriously, I'm unable to engage with this play, no matter how many times I revisit it. And the Argo recording is truly splendid, with more period music than ever and a really great…

The Other Transcendent

The Tempest, that odd, beautiful play, brings to finality several of Shakespeare's common running themes, most notably that of the misfit or social reject. I think back nearly to the beginning of this blog, a year ago, and Aaron the Moor, Richard of Gloucester, and the long train of characters who for some reason or…

Beyond Words

Here's flowers for you; Hot lavender, mints, savoury, marjoram; The marigold, that goes to bed wi' the sun And with him rises weeping: these are flowers Of middle summer, and I think they are given To men of middle age. *** The image of Perdita, the lost child of angry Leontes, handing out restorative herbs…

Conversations with a Headless Corpse

And it's true, a headless corpse is on stage for goodly portion of Act IV of Cymbeline. The heroine, mistaking the deceased for her husband, swoons and lies unconscious on it. I suppose this is more difficult to process if you're watching the play on stage - is it appalling? Over the top, unintentionally (or…

Actor Interrupted

It's public knowledge, apparently, that Caius Marcius is a mama's boy with an implacable hatred for the "common man" that counters the value of his public service and makes him potentially unfit for office. It takes only a few moments, in the very first scene of Coriolanus, for a random group of citizens ┬áto discuss…

And then this happened…

Delighted to enter the strange, beautiful world of Shakespeare's Romances - a world where verse and prose are stylistically inconsistent (due in part to collaboration with other playwrights, but also to the poet's increasingly complex relationship to the formal constraints of iambic pentameter). A world where character development is non-existent and plots are driven not…

Cleopatra and Antony

A YouTube video posted by the Royal Shakespeare Company advertises, with calm futility, a 2010 production of Antony and Cleopatra. The video's description sticks in my mind - "Two charismatic and powerful leaders find in each other an irresistible and yet unattainable." Ignoring the curious omission of a final object for the sentence (unattainable what?),…

Present Horror

The litmus test for a production of Macbeth is Act II Scene IV. It should be deeply disturbing. An unknown old man talks to the Thane of Ross about how unglued everything has become since the head of state was wantonly murdered in his own bed in the dead of night. And we audience members,…